John E. Mack was an American psychiatrist, writer and professor as well as the head of department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

Mack’s clinical expertise was in child psychology, adolescent psychology, and the psychology of religion.

He was also known as a leading researcher on the psychology of teenage suicide and drug addiction, and later became a researcher in the psychology of alien abduction experiences.

It wasn’t until the early 1990’s that Mack commenced on a decade-plus of psychological study of 200 men and women alike, who all reported recurring alien experiences. These encounters had up until then seen some very limited attention from academic figures, with Leo Sprinkle perhaps being the earliest in the 1960’s.

To this day, Mack remains the most esteemed academic who has studied the subject.

In his initial work, he suspected that the subjects were suffering from mental illness, but as time grew on and he did not discover any obvious pathologies in the people he interviewed, his interest began peaking.

Mack began concerted studies and interviews.

In his interviews, many reported that their encounters had affected the way they regarded the world, including producing a heightened sense of spirituality and environmental concern.

Given Mack’s long and esteemed career, he was much more guarded and conservative in his investigations and interpretations of the abduction phenomenon.

In a 1996 interview with PBS, Mack stated: “It’s both literally, physically happening to a degree; and it’s also some kind of psychological, spiritual experience occurring and originating perhaps in another dimension”.

The BBC even quoted Mack saying: “I would never say yes, yes, there are aliens taking people. But, I would say there is a compelling powerful phenomenon here that I can’t account for in any other way, that’s mysterious. Yet I can’t know what it is but it seems to me that it invites to a deeper, further inquiry.”

Mack went on several shows and brought with him some of his subjects, who gave detailed accounts of what they had gone through and what they could remember.

As Mack had stated, these were people who did not know each other, who lived in different parts of the country, and many who had more academic and serious professions who were telling these stories with vivid memory.

Mack also said that there were different entities who carried out these experiences, or abductions. From all the subjects which he had, he said there were some recurring ones.

There were the greys, little grey men with big black eyes, some that were more reptilian and who could do amazing things with their scales, and then there were also more humanoid looking ones that resembled ourselves more.

As far as credibility goes, Mack’s work has brought a whole deal of credibility to the subject, validating what the subjects experienced, and also setting a precedent for future studies in the field.

Sadly, Mack was killed by a drunk driver as he was walking home alone, after a dinner with friends on September 27, 2004 while in London.

John E. Mack -- October 4, 1929 – September 27, 2004

The Charles Grodin interview of John Mack & Whitley Strieber on the subject of alien encounters. This was recorded on March 18, 1997.

Professor of psychiatry Dr. John Mack and experiencers from around Seattle are interviewed by host Ken Schramon on KOMO's Town Meeting: "Alien Encounters: Fact or Science Fiction?"

A pulitzer price winner & Harvard Medical Professor

John E. Mack was an American psychiatrist, writer and professor as well as the head of department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

Mack’s clinical expertise was in child psychology, adolescent psychology, and the psychology of religion.

John E. Mack -- October 4, 1929 – September 27, 2004

He was also known as a leading researcher on the psychology of teenage suicide and drug addiction, and later became a researcher in the psychology of alien abduction experiences.

It wasn’t until the early 1990’s that Mack commenced on a decade-plus of psychological study of 200 men and women alike, who all reported recurring alien experiences. These encounters had up until then seen some very limited attention from academic figures, with Leo Sprinkle perhaps being the earliest in the 1960’s.

A pulitzer price winner & Harvard Medical Professor

To this day, Mack remains the most esteemed academic who has studied the subject.

In his initial work, he suspected that the subjects were suffering from mental illness, but as time grew on and he did not discover any obvious pathologies in the people he interviewed, his interest began peaking.

Mack began concerted studies and interviews.

In his interviews, many reported that their encounters had affected the way they regarded the world, including producing a heightened sense of spirituality and environmental concern.

Given Mack’s long and esteemed career, he was much more guarded and conservative in his investigations and interpretations of the abduction phenomenon.

In a 1996 interview with PBS, Mack stated: “It’s both literally, physically happening to a degree; and it’s also some kind of psychological, spiritual experience occurring and originating perhaps in another dimension”.

The BBC even quoted Mack saying: “I would never say yes, yes, there are aliens taking people. But, I would say there is a compelling powerful phenomenon here that I can’t account for in any other way, that’s mysterious. Yet I can’t know what it is but it seems to me that it invites to a deeper, further inquiry.”

Mack went on several shows and brought with him some of his subjects, who gave detailed accounts of what they had gone through and what they could remember.

As Mack had stated, these were people who did not know each other, who lived in different parts of the country, and many who had more academic and serious professions who were telling these stories with vivid memory.

Mack also said that there were different entities who carried out these experiences, or abductions. From all the subjects which he had, he said there were some recurring ones.

There were the greys, little grey men with big black eyes, some that were more reptilian and who could do amazing things with their scales, and then there were also more humanoid looking ones that resembled ourselves more.

As far as credibility goes, Mack’s work has brought a whole deal of credibility to the subject, validating what the subjects experienced, and also setting a precedent for future studies in the field.

Sadly, Mack was killed by a drunk driver as he was walking home alone, after a dinner with friends on September 27, 2004 while in London.

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